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Transl Res. 2008 Sep;152(3):103-12. doi: 10.1016/j.trsl.2008.05.009. Epub 2008 Jun 26.

Infrared spectroscopy: a reagent-free method to distinguish Alzheimer's disease patients from normal-aging subjects.

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1
INSERM U876, Université Bordeaux, France. evelyne.peuchant@biomemohv.u-bordeaux2.fr

Abstract

The physiopathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is related to various biochemical mechanisms that may be reflected by changes in plasma components. In the current study, Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy was used to identify these biochemical variations by monitoring spectral differences in the plasma of 40 AD patients compared with those of 112 control subjects. A hierarchical classification in the whole mid-infrared region allowed a clear separation between AD and controls (C) that was optimized by using a restricted spectral range (1480-1428 cm(-1)). Spectral changes confirmed vibration differences between AD and C mostly related to modified lipid and nucleic acid structures involved in oxidative stress-dependent processes of AD. Moreover, the analysis of samples in the 1480-910-cm(-1) region allowed the distinction between C and AD with an accuracy of 98.4% and showed 2 subgroups C(1) and C(2) within the C group. Interestingly, the C(1) subgroup was located closer to the AD group than the C(2) subgroup, which suggests biochemical differences within the nondemented subjects. Biochemical studies revealed a significant increase in a specific marker of oxidative stress, F8-isoprostanes (8-epi-PGF2alpha) levels, in the plasma of AD patients as compared with total controls and subgroup C(2) but not subgroup C(1). Thus, these results suggest that use of FT-IR spectroscopy could be valuable to distinguish AD patients from normal-aging subjects.

PMID:
18774539
DOI:
10.1016/j.trsl.2008.05.009
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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