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Best Pract Res Clin Obstet Gynaecol. 2008 Oct;22(5):801-23. doi: 10.1016/j.bpobgyn.2008.06.005. Epub 2008 Aug 28.

Physiological changes of pregnancy and monitoring.

Author information

1
Liverpool Women's Hospital, Liverpool L22 7RH, UK. carlinandrew@doctors.org.uk

Abstract

Advances in medical care have led to increasing numbers of complex, high-risk obstetric patients. Specialist training and a sound knowledge of normal maternal physiology are essential to optimize outcomes. One of the earliest observed changes is peripheral vasodilatation; this causes a fall in systemic vascular resistance and triggers physiological changes in the cardiovascular and renal systems, with 40-50% increases in cardiac output and glomerular filtration rates. Safety concerns over Swan Ganz catheters have driven the increasing interest in alternative techniques, such as echocardiography, thoracic bioimpedance and pulse contour analysis, although their exact roles in future obstetric high-dependency care have yet to be established. Analysis of arterial blood gases is fundamental to the management of sick patients, and correct interpretation can be aided by a systematic approach. Observation charts are almost ubiquitous in all aspects of medicine, but little evidence exists to support their use in the high-dependency setting.

PMID:
18760680
DOI:
10.1016/j.bpobgyn.2008.06.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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