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Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol. 2008 Nov;295(5):H1882-94. doi: 10.1152/ajpheart.412.2008. Epub 2008 Aug 29.

Endothelial function and vascular oxidative stress in long-lived GH/IGF-deficient Ames dwarf mice.

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  • 1Department of Physiology, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY 10595, USA.

Abstract

Hypopituitary Ames dwarf mice have low circulating growth hormone (GH)/IGF-I levels, and they have extended longevity and exhibit many symptoms of delayed aging. To elucidate the vascular consequences of Ames dwarfism we compared endothelial O2(-) and H2O2 production, mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, expression of antioxidant enzymes, and nitric oxide (NO) production in aortas of Ames dwarf and wild-type control mice. In Ames dwarf aortas endothelial O2(-) and H2O2 production and ROS generation by mitochondria were enhanced compared with those in vessels of wild-type mice. In Ames dwarf aortas there was a less abundant expression of Mn-SOD, Cu,Zn-SOD, glutathione peroxidase (GPx)-1, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). NO production and acetylcholine-induced relaxation were also decreased in aortas of Ames dwarf mice. In cultured wild-type mouse aortas and in human coronary arterial endothelial cells treatment with GH and IGF significantly reduced cellular O2(-) and H2O2 production and ROS generation by mitochondria and upregulated expression of Mn-SOD, Cu,Zn-SOD, GPx-1, and eNOS. Thus GH and IGF-I promote antioxidant phenotypic changes in the endothelial cells, whereas Ames dwarfism leads to vascular oxidative stress.

PMID:
18757483
PMCID:
PMC2614588
DOI:
10.1152/ajpheart.412.2008
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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