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Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2008 Nov;28(11):1928-36. doi: 10.1161/ATVBAHA.108.162925. Epub 2008 Aug 28.

Chemokines as mediators of neovascularization.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22908-0466, USA.

Abstract

Chemokines are a superfamily of homologous heparin-binding proteins, first described for their role in recruiting leukocytes to sites of inflammation. Chemokines have since been recognized as key factors mediating both physiological and pathological neovascularization in such diverse clinical settings as malignancy, wound repair, chronic fibroproliferative disorders, myocardial ischemia, and atherosclerosis. Members of the CXC chemokine family, structurally defined as containing the ELR amino acid motif, are potent inducers of angiogenesis, whereas another subset of the CXC chemokines inhibits angiogenesis. In addition, CCL2, a CC chemokine ligand, has been implicated in arteriogenesis. In this article, we review the current literature on the role of chemokines as mediators of neovascularization.

PMID:
18757292
PMCID:
PMC2735456
DOI:
10.1161/ATVBAHA.108.162925
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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