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J Biomech Eng. 1991 May;113(2):123-31.

Effects of pulsatile flow on cultured vascular endothelial cell morphology.

Author information

1
School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta 30332-0405.

Abstract

Endothelial cells (EC) appear to adapt their morphology and function to the in vivo hemodynamic environment in which they reside. In vitro experiments indicate that similar alterations occur for cultured EC exposed to a laminar steady-state flow-induced shear stress. However, in vivo EC are exposed to a pulsatile flow environment; thus, in this investigation, the influence of pulsatile flow on cell shape and orientation and on actin microfilament localization in confluent bovine aortic endothelial cell (BAEC) monolayers was studied using a 1-Hz nonreversing sinusoidal shear stress of 40 +/- 20 dynes/cm2 (type I), 1-Hz reversing sinusoidal shear stresses of 20 +/- 40 and 10 +/- 15 dynes/cm2 (type II), and 1-Hz oscillatory shear stresses of 0 +/- 20 and 0 +/- 40 dynes/cm2 (type III). The results show that in a type I nonreversing flow, cell shape changed less rapidly, but cells took on a more elongated shape than their steady flow controls long-term. For low-amplitude type II reversing flow, BAECs changed less rapidly in shape and were always less elongated than their steady controls; however, for high amplitude reversal, BAECs did not stay attached for more than 24 hours. For type III oscillatory flows, BAEC cell shape remained polygonal as in static culture and did not exhibit actin stress fibers, such as occurred in all other flows. These results demonstrate that EC can discriminate between different types of pulsatile flow environments.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

PMID:
1875686
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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