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J Microbiol Biotechnol. 2008 Aug;18(8):1368-76.

Proteomic analysis of recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae upon iron deficiency induced via human H-ferritin production.

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  • 1Faculty of Biological Sciences, Institute for Molecular Biology and Genetics, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756, Korea.

Abstract

In our previous study, the expression of active H-ferritins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was found to reduce cell growth and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation upon exposure to oxidative stress; such expression enhanced that of high-affinity iron transport genes (FET3 and FTR1). The results suggested that the recombinant cells expressing H-ferritins induced cytosolic iron depletion. The present study analyzes metabolic changes under these circumstances via proteomic methods. The YGH2 yeast strain expressing H-ferritin, the YGH2-KG (E62K and H65G) mutant strain, and the YGT control strain were used. Comparative proteomic analysis showed that the synthesis of 34 proteins was at least stimulated in YGH2, whereas the other 37 proteins were repressed. Among these, the 31 major protein spots were analyzed via nano-LC/MS/MS. The increased proteins included major heat-shock proteins and proteins related to endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD). On the other hand, the proteins involved with folate metabolism, purine and methionine biosynthesis, and translation were reduced. In addition, we analyzed the insoluble protein fractions and identified the fragments of Idh1p and Pgk1p, as well as several ribosomal assembly-related proteins. This suggests that intracellular iron depletion induces imperfect translation of proteins. Although the proteins identified above result from changes in iron metabolism (i.e., iron deficiency), definitive evidence for iron-related proteins remains insufficient. Nevertheless, this study is the first to present a molecular model for iron deficiency, and the results may provide valuable information on the regulatory network of iron metabolism.

PMID:
18756096
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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