Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Infect Dis Clin North Am. 2008 Sep;22(3):433-48, viii. doi: 10.1016/j.idc.2008.03.011.

Human granulocytic anaplasmosis.

Author information

1
Department of Family Medicine, University of Minnesota Duluth, School of Medicine, 1001 E. Superior Street, Suite L201, Duluth, MN 55202, USA. jbakken@slhduluth.com

Abstract

Tick-borne infections have been recognized in the United States for more than a century. Patients who present with nonspecific fever after exposure to ticks should be evaluated by clinical examination and routine laboratory testing to determine if the illness is potentially a tick-borne infection. This article focuses on the diagnosis and management of human granulocytic anaplasmosis (HGA) caused by Anaplasma phagocytophilum.

PMID:
18755383
DOI:
10.1016/j.idc.2008.03.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center