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Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2008 Oct;118(4):305-14. doi: 10.1111/j.1600-0447.2008.01241.x. Epub 2008 Aug 26.

Association of perceived stigma and mood and anxiety disorders: results from the World Mental Health Surveys.

Author information

1
Health Services Research Unit, Institut Municipal d'Investigació Mèdica (IMIM-Hospital del Mar), Barcelona, Spain. jalonso@imim.es

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

We assessed the prevalence of perceived stigma among persons with mental disorders and chronic physical conditions in an international study.

METHOD:

Perceived stigma (reporting health-related embarrassment and discrimination) was assessed among adults reporting significant disability. Mental disorders were assessed with Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) 3.0. Chronic conditions were ascertained by self-report. Household-residing adults (80,737) participated in 17 population surveys in 16 countries.

RESULTS:

Perceived stigma was present in 13.5% (22.1% in developing and 11.7% in developed countries). Suffering from a depressive or an anxiety disorder (vs. no mental disorder) was associated with about a twofold increase in the likelihood of stigma, while comorbid depression and anxiety was even more strongly associated (OR 3.4, 95%CI 2.7-4.2). Chronic physical conditions showed a much lower association.

CONCLUSION:

Perceived stigma is frequent and strongly associated with mental disorders worldwide. Efforts to alleviate stigma among individuals with comorbid depression and anxiety are needed.

PMID:
18754833
PMCID:
PMC3040096
DOI:
10.1111/j.1600-0447.2008.01241.x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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