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HSS J. 2008 Feb;4(1):48-54. doi: 10.1007/s11420-007-9061-4.

Total hip arthroplasty is less painful at 12 months compared with hemiarthroplasty in treatment of displaced femoral neck fracture.

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1
Center of Hip and Knee Replacement, Columbia University, 622 W 168 St, PH-1146, New York, NY 10032, USA. wm143@columbia.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The Displaced Femoral (neck fracture) Arthroplasty Consortium for Treatment and Outcomes (DFACTO) study compared total hip arthroplasty (THA) to hemiarthroplasty in the treatment of displaced femoral neck fractures.

DESIGN:

This study was designed as a prospective, randomized clinical trial.

SETTING:

The study was conducted in five US academic and private medical centers.

PATIENTS:

Patients were composed of independent, mentally competent individuals, >50 years old who suffered a displaced femoral neck fracture without existing arthritis at the hip. Forty-one patients were enrolled.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Functional outcomes and quality of life were assessed at 6 and 12 months post-fracture using the SF-36, Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), the Harris Hip Score, and the Timed "Up & Go" Test (TUG test).

RESULTS:

Groups were equivalent at baseline in terms of age, comorbid conditions, and functional status. At 6 months, there were no significant differences between the groups using the outcome measures or overall rates of complications. There was one dislocation in the THA group (5.8% of patients). At 12 months, the THA group reported significantly less pain (53.2 +/- 10.2) than the hemiarthroplasty group (42.4 +/- 11.5) using the SF-36 (p = 0.02). Using the TUG Test, we observed a greater proportion of THA patients remain functionally independent 1 year after surgery compared the hemiarthroplasty group (p = 0.08, controlling for age and sex).

CONCLUSIONS:

These differences in pain and functional outcomes suggest THA is a viable treatment option for the active elderly displaced femoral neck fracture population.

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