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Neurourol Urodyn. 2009;28(1):18-21. doi: 10.1002/nau.20610.

Clean intermittent self-catheterization: a burden for the patient?

Author information

1
Department of Urology, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland. tkessler@gmx.ch

Abstract

AIM:

To assess patients' perception of clean intermittent self-catheterization (CISC) for voiding dysfunction.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

A total of 101 patients performing CISC because of voiding dysfunction were invited to participate in this questionnaire survey. The response rate was 91% (92/101).

RESULTS:

The mean time over which CISC was performed was 5 years (standard deviation (SD) +/- 6.3) and the mean frequency of CISC per day was three times (SD +/- 2). Almost 80% (72/92) of the patients perceived CISC as easy or very easy and CISC did not interfere at all or interfered a little bit with work or other regular daily activities in more than 80% (76/92). Almost 90% (80/92) reported no or minimal pain while performing CISC. This did not interfere at all or interfered a little bit with work or other regular daily activities in almost 90% (80/92). Quality of life improved considerably due to CISC in more than 60% (56/92) and 12% (11/92) complained of a deterioration. In multivariable analysis, severe pain performing CISC (odds ratio 20.9, 95% confidence interval 1.7-259.9, P = 0.018) was the only factor that predicted poor quality of life.

CONCLUSIONS:

The majority of patients considered CISC to be an easy and painless procedure which did not interfere with daily activities. Consequently, quality of life improved in more than 60% of the patients. Therefore, CISC does not appear to be a burden for the patient and, from a patient's perspective, can be recommended.

PMID:
18726939
DOI:
10.1002/nau.20610
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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