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Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol. 2008 Oct;295(4):H1720-5. doi: 10.1152/ajpheart.00623.2008. Epub 2008 Aug 22.

Role played by acid-sensitive ion channels in evoking the exercise pressor reflex.

Author information

1
Heart and Vascular Institute, Pennsylvania State College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania 17033, USA. shayes1@hmc.psu.edu

Abstract

The exercise pressor reflex arises from contracting skeletal muscle and is believed to play a role in evoking the cardiovascular responses to static exercise, effects that include increases in arterial pressure and heart rate. This reflex is believed to be evoked by the metabolic and mechanical stimulation of thin fiber muscle afferents. Lactic acid is known to be an important metabolic stimulus evoking the reflex. Until recently, the only antagonist for acid-sensitive ion channels (ASICs), the receptors to lactic acid, was amiloride, a substance that is also a potent antagonist for both epithelial sodium channels as well as voltage-gated sodium channels. Recently, a second compound, A-317567, has been shown to be an effective and selective antagonist to ASICs in vitro. Consequently, we measured the pressor responses to the static contraction of the triceps surae muscles in decerebrate cats before and after a popliteal arterial injection of A-317567 (10 mM solution; 0.5 ml). We found that this ASIC antagonist significantly attenuated by half (P<0.05) the pressor responses to both contraction and to lactic acid injection into the popliteal artery. In contrast, A-317567 had no effect on the pressor responses to tendon stretch, a pure mechanical stimulus, and to a popliteal arterial injection of capsaicin, which stimulated transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 channels. We conclude that ASICs on thin fiber muscle afferents play a substantial role in evoking the metabolic component of the exercise pressor reflex.

PMID:
18723762
PMCID:
PMC2593518
DOI:
10.1152/ajpheart.00623.2008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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