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J Urol. 2008 Oct;180(4 Suppl):1824-6; discussion 1827. doi: 10.1016/j.juro.2008.03.105. Epub 2008 Aug 21.

Management of urachal remnants in early childhood.

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1
Departments of Urology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73104, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Generally, it is recommended that all urachal remnants be excised to avoid recurrent disease and possible malignant transformation later in life. However, spontaneous resolution with no need for further intervention has been reported. We reviewed the experience with urachal remnants at a single institution and evaluated which patients could be treated nonoperatively and which required surgical intervention.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

We reviewed the medical records and radiographic studies of all patients with urachal remnants from January 1999 to January 2007. Patients were analyzed according to initial presentation, imaging findings and treatment. Serial clinical examinations and radiographic imaging were used to follow patients.

RESULTS:

An external urachal sinus was found in 9 patients (39.1%) and 1 was surgically excised. Of the 12 urachal cysts (52.2%) 9 ultimately required surgical excision, of which 6 were infected initially. A patent urachus was found in 2 patients, which resolved during an observation period. Radiographic imaging and/or physical examination diagnosed all remnants initially and confirmed complete resolution during followup. Eight of the 10 urachal remnants (80.0%) that resolved developed in patients younger than 6 months. Various accompanying urogenital anomalies were found in 8 patients (34.8%).

CONCLUSIONS:

A small urachal remnant, especially at birth, may be viewed as physiological. Urachal remnants in patients younger than 6 months are likely to resolve with nonoperative management. However, if symptoms persist or the urachal remnant fails to resolve after 6 months of age, it should be excised to prevent recurrent infections.

PMID:
18721938
DOI:
10.1016/j.juro.2008.03.105
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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