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Ann Behav Med. 2008 Aug;36(1):81-6. doi: 10.1007/s12160-008-9047-6. Epub 2008 Aug 22.

Prevalence of and associations with waterpipe tobacco smoking among U.S. university students.

Author information

  • 1Division of General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. bprimack@pitt.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Although waterpipe tobacco smoking seems to be increasing on U.S. university campuses, these data have come from convenience samples.

PURPOSE:

We aimed to determine the prevalence of and associations with waterpipe tobacco smoking among a random sample of students.

METHODS:

We surveyed a random sample of graduate and undergraduate students at a large, urban university. We used multivariate modeling to determine independent associations between belief-related predictors and waterpipe tobacco smoking.

RESULTS:

Of the 647 respondents, waterpipe smoking was reported in 40.5%, over the past year in 30.6%, and over the past 30 days in 9.5%. Over half of the sample (52.1%) perceived that tobacco smoking from a waterpipe was less addictive than cigarette smoking. In fully adjusted multivariate models, 1-year waterpipe smoking was associated with low perceived harm (OR = 2.54, 95% CI = 1.68, 3.83), low perceived addictiveness (OR = 4.64, 95% CI = 3.03, 7.10), perception of high social acceptability (OR = 20.00, 95% CI = 6.03, 66.30), and high perception of popularity (OR = 4.72, 95% CI = 2.85, 7.82).

CONCLUSIONS:

In this sample, lifetime waterpipe use was as common as lifetime cigarette use. Perception of harm, perception of addictiveness, social acceptability, and popularity were all strongly related to waterpipe smoking.

PMID:
18719977
PMCID:
PMC3004534
DOI:
10.1007/s12160-008-9047-6
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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