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PLoS One. 2008 Aug 21;3(8):e3035. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0003035.

Pathology of Puumala hantavirus infection in macaques.

Author information

1
Department of Virology, Haartman Institute, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. Tarja.Sironen@helsinki.fi

Abstract

Hantaviruses are globally important human pathogens that cause hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome and hantavirus pulmonary syndrome. Capillary leakage is central to hantaviral diseases, but how it develops, has remained unknown. It has been hypothesized that the pathogenesis of hantavirus infection would be a complex interplay between direct viral effects and immunopathological mechanisms. Both of these were studied in the so far best model of mild hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome, i.e. cynomolgus macaques infected with wild-type Puumala hantavirus. Viral RNA detected by in situ hybridization and nucleocapsid protein detected by immunohistochemical staining were observed in kidney, spleen and liver tissues. Inflammatory cell infiltrations and tubular damage were found in the kidneys, and these infiltrations contained mainly CD8-type T-cells. Importantly, these results are consistent with those obtained from patients with hantaviral disease, thus showing that the macaque model of hantavirus infection mimics human infection also on the tissue level. Furthermore, both the markers of viral replication and the T-cells appeared to co-localize in the kidneys to the sites of tissue damage, suggesting that these two together might be responsible for the pathogenesis of hantavirus infection.

PMID:
18716663
PMCID:
PMC2516326
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0003035
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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