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Sleep. 2008 Aug;31(8):1119-26.

Hypocretin receptor expression in canine and murine narcolepsy models and in hypocretin-ligand deficient human narcolepsy.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, Stanford University, Center for Narcolepsy, Palo Alto, CA, USA.

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVE:

To determine whether hypocretin receptor gene (hcrtR1 and hcrtR2) expression is affected after long-term hypocretin ligand loss in humans and animal models of narcolepsy.

DESIGN:

Animal and human study. We measured hcrtR1 and hcrtR2 expression in the frontal cortex and pons using the RT-PCR method in murine models (8-week-old and 27-week-old orexin/ataxin-3 transgenic (TG) hypocretin cell ablated mice and wild-type mice from the same litter, 10 mice for each group), in canine models (8 genetically narcoleptic Dobermans with null mutations in the hcrtR2, 9 control Dobermans, 3 sporadic ligand-deficient narcoleptics, and 4 small breed controls), and in humans (5 narcolepsy-cataplexy patients with hypocretin deficiency (average age 77.0 years) and 5 control subjects (72.6 years).

MEASUREMENT AND RESULTS:

27-week-old (but not 8-week-old) TG mice showed significant decreases in hcrtR1 expression, suggesting the influence of the long-term ligand loss on the receptor expression. Both sporadic narcoleptic dogs and human narcolepsy-cataplexy subjects showed a significant decrease in hcrtR1 expression, while declines in hcrtR2 expression were not significant in these cases. HcrtR2-mutated narcoleptic Dobermans (with normal ligand production) showed no alteration in hcrtR1 expression.

CONCLUSIONS:

Moderate declines in hcrtR expressions, possibly due to long-term postnatal loss of ligand production, were observed in hypocretin-ligand deficient narcoleptic subjects. These declines are not likely to be progressive and complete. The relative preservation of hcrtR2 expression also suggests that hypocretin based therapies are likely to be a viable therapeutic options in human narcolepsy-cataplexy.

PMID:
18714784
PMCID:
PMC2542958
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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