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J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2008 Aug 15;233(4):613-7. doi: 10.2460/javma.233.4.613.

Comparison of temperature readings from a percutaneous thermal sensing microchip with temperature readings from a digital rectal thermometer in equids.

Author information

1
Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To compare temperature readings from an implantable percutaneous thermal sensing microchip with temperature readings from a digital rectal thermometer, to identify factors that affect microchip readings, and to estimate the sensitivity and specificity of the microchip for fever detection.

DESIGN:

Prospective study.

ANIMALS:

52 Welsh pony foals that were 6 to 10 months old and 30 Quarter Horses that were 2 years old.

PROCEDURES:

Data were collected in summer, winter, and fall in groups 1 (n = 23 ponies), 2 (29 ponies), and 3 (30 Quarter Horses), respectively. Temperature readings from a digital rectal thermometer and a percutaneous thermal sensing microchip as well as ambient temperature were recorded daily for 17, 23, and 19 days in groups 1 through 3, respectively. Effects of ambient temperature and rectal temperature on thermal sensor readings were estimated. Sensitivity and specificity of the thermal sensor for detection of fever (rectal temperature, >or= 38.9 degrees C [102 degrees F]) were estimated separately for data collection at ambient temperatures <or= 15.6 degrees C (60 degrees F) and > 15.6 degrees C.

RESULTS:

Mean ambient temperatures were 29.0 degrees C (84.2 degrees F), -2.7 degrees C (27.1 degrees F), and 10.4 degrees C (50.8 degrees F) for groups 1 through 3, respectively. Thermal sensor readings varied with ambient temperature and rectal temperature. Rectal temperatures ranged from 36.2 degrees to 41.7 degrees C (97.2 degrees to 107 degrees F), whereas thermal sensor temperature readings ranged from 23.9 degrees (75 degrees F) to 42.2 degrees C (75 degrees to 108 degrees F). Sensitivity for fever detection was 87.4%, 53.3%, and 58.3% in groups 1 to 3, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE:

The thermal sensor appeared to have potential use for initial screening of body temperature in equids at ambient temperatures > 15.6 degrees C.

PMID:
18710319
DOI:
10.2460/javma.233.4.613
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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