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Otol Neurotol. 2008 Oct;29(7):976-81. doi: 10.1097/MAO.0b013e318184586d.

Daily exercise does not prevent recurrence of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

Author information

1
Department of Physical Therapy, Midwestern University, Downers Grove, Illinois, USA. jhelmi@midwestern.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The purpose of this study was to analyze if a daily routine of self-canalith repositioning procedure (CRP) will increase the time to recurrence and reduce the rate of recurrence of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV).

STUDY DESIGN:

Prospective study, nonrandomized control group.

SETTING:

Outpatient clinic.

PATIENTS:

Thirty-nine patients diagnosed with posterior canal BPPV successfully treated with the CRP. Based on a convenience sample, 17 (44%) patients were assigned to the treatment group, whereas 22 (56%) were assigned to the no-treatment group. The number of subjects lost at the time of follow-up were 5 (29.4%) of the treatment group and 2 (9%) of the no-treatment group.

INTERVENTIONS:

Patients assigned to the treatment group performed the self-CRP daily, whereas those assigned to the no-treatment group performed no exercises. Patients were followed for up to 2 years.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

The main outcome measures were the rate of recurrence of BPPV and the time for BPPV to recur.

RESULTS:

Of the 39 subjects, symptoms recurred in 16 (41%) of the total population, 6 (35%) of 17 of the treatment group, and 10 (46%) of 22 of the no-treatment group. There was no difference in the frequency of recurrence (Pearson chi; p = 0.522) or the time to recurrence (survival analysis; log-rank test; p = 0.242).

CONCLUSION:

Our results suggest that a daily routine of the self-CRP does not affect the time to recurrence and the rate of recurrence of posterior canal-BPPV.

PMID:
18698271
DOI:
10.1097/MAO.0b013e318184586d
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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