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Diabetes Care. 2008 Nov;31(11):2110-2. doi: 10.2337/dc08-0863. Epub 2008 Aug 11.

Duration of nocturnal hypoglycemia before seizures.

Author information

1
Lucile Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford, Pediatric Endocrinology, Stanford, California, USA. buckingham@stanford.edu.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Despite a high incidence of nocturnal hypoglycemia documented by the use of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM), there are no reports in the literature of nocturnal hypoglycemic seizures while a patient is wearing a CGM device.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS:

In this article, we describe four such cases and assess the duration of nocturnal hypoglycemia before the seizure.

RESULTS:

In the cases where patients had a nocturnal hypoglycemic seizure while wearing a CGM device, sensor hypoglycemia (<60 mg/dl) was documented on the CGM record for 2.25-4 h before seizure activity.

CONCLUSIONS:

Even with a subcutaneous glucose lag of 18 min when compared with blood glucose measurements, glucose sensors have time to provide clinically meaningful alarms. Current nocturnal hypoglycemic alarms need to be improved, however, since patients can sleep through the current alarm systems.

PMID:
18694975
PMCID:
PMC2571056
DOI:
10.2337/dc08-0863
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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