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Vision Res. 2009 Jun;49(10):1154-65. doi: 10.1016/j.visres.2008.07.012. Epub 2008 Aug 30.

Top-down and bottom-up mechanisms in biasing competition in the human brain.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology and Beckman Institute, University of Illinois, Urbana, 61801, USA. dmbeck@uiuc.edu

Abstract

The biased competition theory of selective attention has been an influential neural theory of attention, motivating numerous animal and human studies of visual attention and visual representation. There is now neural evidence in favor of all three of its most basic principles: that representation in the visual system is competitive; that both top-down and bottom-up biasing mechanisms influence the ongoing competition; and that competition is integrated across brain systems. We review the evidence in favor of these three principles, and in particular, findings related to six more specific neural predictions derived from these original principles.

PMID:
18694779
PMCID:
PMC2740806
DOI:
10.1016/j.visres.2008.07.012
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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