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Fertil Steril. 2009 Aug;92(2):770-7. doi: 10.1016/j.fertnstert.2008.06.032. Epub 2008 Aug 9.

Transplantation of frozen-thawed late-gestational-age human fetal ovaries into immunodeficient mice.

Author information

1
Infertility and IVF Unit, Helen Schneider Hospital for Women, Rabin Medical Center, Beilinson Hospital, Petach Tikva 49100, Israel.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To compare the development of human fetal follicles from late-gestational-age fetuses frozen-thawed gradually and slowly with dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) or 1,2 propanediol (PROH) and sucrose after renal grafting into follicle stimulating hormone-treated immunodeficient mice.

DESIGN:

Controlled histologic study of grafted human fetal ovaries.

SETTING:

Major tertiary care academic center.

PATIENT(S):

Eleven women undergoing pregnancy termination at 22 to 33 gestational weeks.

INTERVENTION(S):

None.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S):

Microscopic morphometric analysis and immunohistochemistry for proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA).

RESULT(S):

Only follicles from samples frozen-thawed with PROH developed to secondary and antral stages 4 to 6 months after grafting, with PCNA expression in their granulosa cells. However, the number of surviving/developing follicles per section was very low (4-25 per graft), compared with 71 to 406 follicles in pretransplantation samples. Graft recovery was very high, with similar rates for transplants frozen-thawed with PROH and DMSO. Normal ovarian structure after grafting was identified only in the PROH frozen-thawed grafts. In deteriorated grafts, frozen-thawed with either DMSO or PROH, net-like hollows replaced follicles, whereas tubule-like structures were only identified in DMSO frozen-thawed grafts.

CONCLUSION(S):

This is the first report of the development of late-pregnancy-stage human fetal follicles in immunodeficient mice. PROH freezing-thawing supported development and survival better than DMSO. However, the low follicular survival points to the urgent need for efficient methods to enhance vascularization rate and prevent ischemia.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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