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Patient Educ Couns. 2008 Nov;73(2):333-8. doi: 10.1016/j.pec.2008.06.014.

Parental anxiety and depression associated with caring for a child newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes: opportunities for education and counseling.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences,, Children's National Medical Center, Washington, DC 20010, USA. rstreis@cnmc.org

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine demographic and clinical characteristics, such as pediatric parenting stress and self-efficacy for diabetes care, of parents of children newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes that are associated with parental anxiety and depression.

METHODS:

102 parents reported on their levels of depression (CESD), state anxiety (STAI), pediatric parenting stress (PIP), and self-efficacy for diabetes care (SED) within 4 weeks of their child's diagnosis with type 1 diabetes. Data were analyzed using hierarchical multiple regression.

RESULTS:

Parents' scores in the clinical range for depression and anxiety were associated with increased frequency and difficulty of pediatric parenting stress, and there was a trend for depression to be related to lower self-efficacy for diabetes care. The association of female gender with anxiety and depression was partially mediated by more frequent pediatric parenting stress.

CONCLUSION:

Parents of children newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes are at risk for experiencing anxiety and depression, related, in part, to their experiences of pediatric parenting stress.

PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS:

Providers and educators should be aware of the risk for depression and anxiety in parents and should work to decrease pediatric parenting stress, increase self-efficacy, and refer parents who are experiencing significant anxiety or depression following their child's diagnosis to a mental health specialist.

PMID:
18692342
DOI:
10.1016/j.pec.2008.06.014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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