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J Gastrointest Surg. 2009 Jan;13(1):44-53. doi: 10.1007/s11605-008-0613-9. Epub 2008 Aug 7.

Dendritic cells in Barrett's esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma.

Author information

1
Department of Surgery and Centre for Immunology, St Vincent's Hospital, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Like other premalignant conditions that develop in the presence of chronic inflammation, the development and progression of Barrett's esophagus is associated with the development of an immune response, but how this immune response is regulated is poorly understood. A comprehensive literature search failed to find any report of the presence of dendritic cells in Barrett's intestinal metaplasia and esophageal adenocarcinoma and this prompted our study.

MATERIAL AND METHODS:

We used immunohistochemical staining and electron microscopy to examine whether dendritic cells are present in Barrett's esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma. Immunohistochemical staining with CD83, a specific marker for dendritic cells, was performed on paraffin-embedded sections of Barrett's intestinal metaplasia (IM, n = 12), dysplasia (n = 11) and adenocarcinoma (n = 14).

RESULTS:

CD83+ cells were identified in the lamina propria surrounding intestinal type glands in Barrett's IM, dysplasia, and cancer tissues. Computerized quantitative analysis showed that the numbers of dendritic cells were significantly higher in cancer tissues. Double immunostaining with CD83, CD20, and CD3, and electron microscopy demonstrated that dendritic cells are present in Barrett's esophagus and form clusters with T cells and B cells directly within the lamina propria.

CONCLUSIONS:

These findings demonstrate that dendritic cells are present in Barrett's tissues, with a significant increase in density in adenocarcinoma compared to benign Barrett's esophagus. Dendritic cells may have a role in the pathogenesis and immunotherapy treatment of Barrett's esophagus and adenocarcinoma.

PMID:
18685901
DOI:
10.1007/s11605-008-0613-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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