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Prim Care Diabetes. 2008 Feb;2(1):31-7. doi: 10.1016/j.pcd.2007.12.001. Epub 2008 Jan 25.

Effects of the pharmacist's input on glycaemic control and cardiovascular risks in Muslim diabetes.

Author information

1
Department of Pharmacy, Nue-Klong Community Hospital, Krabi Province 81130, Thailand.

Abstract

AIMS:

To determine whether an extended pharmacy service would improve glycaemic control and cardiovascular risks in diabetic Muslims.

METHODS:

Ambulatory literate adult diabetic Muslims with A1C >7% were randomly assigned to either a study group (usual care plus added pharmacist input, N=63) or a control group (usual care only, N=67). On four consecutive visits, at 2-month intervals, the study group met a pharmacist who educated and discussed with each patient regarding medication uses and diabetic treatment. This was accompanied by providing a diabetic pamphlet. Changes in A1C (mg/dL), lipid parameters (mg/dL), medication adherence (% pill count) and diabetic knowledge scores were measured.

RESULTS:

There was no difference in A1C reduction between the study and the control groups (-0.8 vs. -0.6, p=0.56). Total cholesterol and LDL-C improvements were greater in the study group than in the control group (-31.6 vs. -1.2, p=0.000; -15.0 vs. +9.1, p=0.002, respectively). The percent pill count (+6.8 vs. -2.8, p=0.004) and diabetic knowledge scores (+2.1 vs. +0.6, p=0.002) were increased in the study group but not in the control group.

CONCLUSION:

The pharmacist' s one-on-one education on diabetes accompanied by its pamphlet, in Muslim patients with diabetes did not affect glycaemic outcome but reduction in cardiovascular risks through lowering total cholesterol and LDL-C was found. The strategies may also improve diabetic knowledge and medication adherence.

PMID:
18684418
DOI:
10.1016/j.pcd.2007.12.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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