Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Psychiatr Serv. 2008 Aug;59(8):921-4. doi: 10.1176/ps.2008.59.8.921.

Perceived barriers to medical care and mental health care among veterans with serious mental illness.

Author information

1
Veterans Affairs Capitol Network (VISN 5) Mental Illness Research, Education and Clinical Center, 6A-157, VA Maryland Healthcare System, 10 North Greene St., Baltimore, MD 21201, USA. amy.drapalski@va.gov

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

This study examined perceived barriers to mental health care and medical care and the relationship between demographic and clinical characteristics and perceived barriers among veterans with serious mental illness.

METHODS:

Veterans diagnosed as having serious mental illnesses, hospitalized for psychiatric concerns, and at risk for treatment dropout (N=136) completed an interview as part of a larger study of a critical time intervention.

RESULTS:

Many participants perceived barriers to accessing mental health care (67%) and medical care (60%). Personal factors were cited most often as barriers; overall, however, personal barriers were more likely to be perceived to impede mental health care (56%) than medical care (43%). Psychiatric symptoms were associated with greater perceived barriers to mental health care and medical care.

CONCLUSIONS:

Veterans with serious mental illness at risk of treatment dropout perceived barriers to mental health care and medical services. Strategies to overcome barriers are needed and should target illness-related factors that may impede service use.

PMID:
18678691
DOI:
10.1176/ps.2008.59.8.921
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Atypon
Loading ...
Support Center