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Clin Rehabil. 2008 Aug;22(8):714-21. doi: 10.1177/0269215508089058.

A phase II exploratory cluster randomized controlled trial of a group mobility training and staff education intervention to promote urinary continence in UK care homes.

Author information

  • 1Department of Primary Care and General Practice, School of Health Sciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, UK. c.m.sackley@bham.ac.uk

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To assess feasibility, acceptability and potential efficacy of group exercise and staff education intervention to promote continence in older people residing in care homes. To establish measures and information to inform a larger trial.

DESIGN:

Phase II pilot exploratory cluster randomized controlled trial.

SETTING:

Six purposely selected care homes in the West Midlands, UK.

SUBJECTS:

Thirty-four care home residents (mean age 86, 29 female), 23 with cognitive impairments.

INTERVENTION:

Physiotherapy-led group exercise and staff continence and mobility facilitation training.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Reported continence status, Rivermead Mobility Index. Feasibility was assessed by uptake and compliance, and acceptability by verbal feedback. A staff knowledge questionnaire was used.

RESULTS:

Thirty-three residents, cluster sizes from 3 to 7. The number of residents agreeing with the statement 'Do you ever leak any urine when you don't mean to?' in the intervention group decreased from 12/17 at baseline to 7/17 at six weeks in the intervention group and increased from 9/16 at baseline to 9/15 at six weeks. The Rivermead Mobility Index scores were better in the intervention group (n=17; baseline: 6.1, six weeks: 6.2) compared with controls (n=16; baseline: 5.9, six weeks: 4.75). The intervention was feasible, well received and had good compliance.

CONCLUSIONS:

Group mobility training and staff education to promote continence is feasible and acceptable for use with care home residents, including those with cognitive impairment.

PMID:
18678571
DOI:
10.1177/0269215508089058
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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