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Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2008 Aug;89(8):1528-34. doi: 10.1016/j.apmr.2008.02.019.

Accuracy of partial weight bearing after autologous chondrocyte implantation.

Author information

1
School of Sport Science, Exercise and Health, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia. jayebert@cyllene.uwa.edu.au

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine whether patients can accurately replicate and retain weight-bearing restrictions in both stationary (static) and dynamic conditions after autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI).

DESIGN:

Case series.

SETTING:

Rehabilitation clinic.

PARTICIPANTS:

A consecutive sample of patients (N=48) who had undergone ACI to a medial or lateral femoral condylar defect in the knee.

INTERVENTIONS:

Patients were trained to partially weight bear using bathroom scales and forearm crutches prior to assessment.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

A force platform was used to measure peak vertical ground reaction forces in patients during static and dynamic conditions immediately after weight-bearing instruction and training, and again during gait 7 days after training.

RESULTS:

Immediately after instruction and weight-bearing practice on a set of scales, patients exerted a mean of 15.8% body weight more than expected during walking for 20% weight-bearing trials, 8.3% more for the 40% trials, 11.9% more for the 60% trials, and 1.2% less for the prescribed 80% trials. Accuracy of weight-bearing replication improved across all weight-bearing levels when assessed 7 days later, when patients exerted a mean of 6.6% body weight more than expected during walking for 20% weight-bearing trials (9.2% body weight improvement), 4.2% more for the 40% trials (4.1% body weight improvement), 9.9% more for the 60% trials (2% body weight improvement), and 0.2% more for the 60% trials (1% body weight improvement).

CONCLUSIONS:

Patients were unable to follow weight-bearing restrictions after instruction and practice on a set of scales, and patients were unable to replicate weight-bearing levels in both static and dynamic conditions.

PMID:
18674988
DOI:
10.1016/j.apmr.2008.02.019
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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