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J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2008 Aug 1;233(3):446-51. doi: 10.2460/javma.233.3.446.

Actinomycin D as rescue therapy in dogs with relapsed or resistant lymphoma: 49 cases (1999--2006).

Author information

1
Animal Cancer and Imaging Center, 8560 Canton Center Rd, Canton, MI 48187, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate response rate and disease-free interval in dogs with relapsed or resistant lymphoma treated with actinomycin D, determine hematologic toxicoses, and identify prognostic factors associated with response to treatment.

DESIGN:

Retrospective case series.

ANIMALS:

49 dogs with relapsed or resistant lymphoma.

PROCEDURES:

Medical records were reviewed for information regarding signalment, physical examination findings, results of diagnostic testing, substage, previous chemotherapy, previous treatment with prednisone, actinomycin D dosage, number of doses administered, response, disease-free interval, and results of CBCs performed after treatment.

RESULTS:

Actinomycin D was administered at a median dosage of 0.68 mg/m2 (range, 0.46 to 0.72 mg/m2), IV, every 3 weeks for 5 treatments or until disease progression. Twenty-six (53%) dogs received prednisone concurrently. Twenty (41%) dogs had a complete remission, and median disease-free interval in these dogs was 129 days. Thrombocytopenia was the most common hematologic toxicosis (n = 22 [45%]). Concurrent prednisone administration, a shorter duration of first remission, and an increased number of previous chemotherapy agents were significantly associated with a lower likelihood of responding to actinomycin D treatment. Concurrent prednisone administration and an increased number of previous chemotherapy agents were significantly associated with a shorter disease-free interval.

CONCLUSION AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE:

Results suggested that administration of actinomycin D as a single agent was effective for rescue chemotherapy of dogs with relapsed or resistant lymphoma and that treatment was well tolerated, although mild thrombocytopenia developed commonly.

PMID:
18673031
DOI:
10.2460/javma.233.3.446
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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