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Lancet Oncol. 2008 Aug;9(8):777-85. doi: 10.1016/S1470-2045(08)70197-9.

Molecular epidemiology, cancer-related symptoms, and cytokines pathway.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology, Division of Cancer Prevention and Population Sciences, The University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030-4009, USA. creyes@mdanderson.org

Abstract

The Human Genome Project and HapMap have led to a better appreciation of the importance of common genetic variation in determining cancer risk, created potential for predicting response to therapy, and made possible the development of targeted prevention and therapeutic interventions. Advances in molecular epidemiology can be used to explore the role of genetic variation in modulating the risk for severe and persistent symptoms, such as pain, depression, and fatigue, in patients with cancer. The same genes that are implicated in cancer risk might also be involved in the modulation of therapeutic outcomes. For example, polymorphisms in several cytokine genes are potential markers for genetic susceptibility both for cancer risk and for cancer-related symptoms. These genetic polymorphisms are stable markers and easily and reliably assayed to explore the extent to which genetic variation might prove useful in identifying patients with cancer at high-risk of symptom development. Likewise, they could identify subgroups who might benefit most from symptom intervention, and contribute to developing personalized and more effective therapies for persistent symptoms.

PMID:
18672213
PMCID:
PMC3390774
DOI:
10.1016/S1470-2045(08)70197-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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