Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2008 Sep;47(9):1030-8. doi: 10.1097/CHI.ObO13e31817eec98.

Joint development of bullying and victimization in adolescence: relations to delinquency and self-harm.

Author information

1
King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry, London, UK. Ted.Barker@iop.kcl.ac.uk

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To estimate trajectories of bullying and victimization in early to mid-adolescence, associations between the trajectories, and links with delinquency and self-harm.

METHOD:

A total of 3,932 adolescents (50% boys) reported bullying (ages 14 to 16), victimization (ages 13 to 16), delinquency (age 16), and self-harm (age 16).

RESULTS:

Two bullying trajectories (low/decreasing, high/increasing) and three victimization trajectories (low, high/decreasing, high/increasing) were identified. Over time, victimization increased the likelihood of involvement in bullying to a greater extent than bullying increased the likelihood of victimization. Boys and girls in the high/increasing bullying and the low or high/increasing victimization trajectories (i.e., the bullies and the bully-victims) were highest in mid-adolescent delinquency. Girls following the high/increasing bullying and high/increasing victimization trajectories (bully-victims) were the highest in mid-adolescent self-harm.

CONCLUSIONS:

Youths who are victimized by their peers are at increased risk, in turn, of victimizing others. Sex-specific adjustment problems are associated with differing patterns of involvement in bullying and victimization among adolescents.

PMID:
18665001
DOI:
10.1097/CHI.ObO13e31817eec98
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center