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Hum Reprod. 2008 Nov;23(11):2466-74. doi: 10.1093/humrep/den189. Epub 2008 Jul 24.

Intraperitoneal inflammation decreases endometriosis in a mouse model.

Author information

1
GDD-TRG Women's Healthcare, Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Berlin, Germany.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The role of the immune system in the pathogenesis of endometriosis remains elusive. It has been shown that patients have an altered peritoneal environment with increased levels of inflammatory cytokines, activated macrophages and reduced clearance of retrogradely transported endometrial fragments. However, it is not known if this unique inflammatory situation is cause or consequence of endometriosis. This study investigates the impact of a pre-existing peritoneal inflammation on endometriosis establishment in a mouse model.

METHODS:

Endometriosis was induced by intraperitoneal injection of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-expressing endometrium in mice. In parallel, a peritonitis model was established via intraperitoneal injection of thioglycolate medium (TM). Finally, endometriosis was induced in the inflamed peritoneal cavity and lesion establishment as well as morphological and histological characteristics were analysed.

RESULTS:

Induction of endometriosis in an inflamed peritoneal cavity resulted in fewer lesions and significantly lower sum of lesion surface area per mouse in the TM-treated group. Additionally, a higher amount of non-attached debris could be detected in the peritoneal cavity of TM-treated mice.

CONCLUSIONS:

An intraperitoneal inflammation decreases endometriosis establishment in this mouse model. Thus, a pre-existing peritoneal inflammation might not be a factor favouring the development of endometriosis.

PMID:
18653673
PMCID:
PMC2569845
DOI:
10.1093/humrep/den189
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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