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PLoS One. 2008 Jul 23;3(7):e2719. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0002719.

Substantial alterations of the cutaneous bacterial biota in psoriatic lesions.

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1
Department of Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York, United States of America.

Abstract

For psoriasis, an idiopathic inflammatory disorder of the skin, the microbial biota has not been defined using cultivation-independent methods. We used broad-range 16S rDNA PCR for archaea and bacteria to examine the microbiota of normal and psoriatic skin. From 6 patients, 19 cutaneous samples (13 from diseased skin and 6 from normal skin) were obtained. Extracted DNA was subjected to the broad range PCR, and 1,925 cloned products were compared with 2,038 products previously reported from healthy persons. Using 98% sequence identity as a species boundary, 1,841 (95.6%) clones were similar to known bacterial 16S rDNA, representing 6 phyla, 86 genera, or 189 species-level operational taxonomic unit (SLOTU); 84 (4.4%) clones with <98% identity probably represented novel species. The most abundant and diverse phylum populating the psoriatic lesions was Firmicutes (46.2%), significantly (P<0.001) overrepresented, compared to the samples from uninvolved skin of the patients (39.0%) and healthy persons (24.4%). In contrast, Actinobacteria, the most prevalent and diverse phylum in normal skin samples from both healthy persons (47.6%) and the patients (47.8%), was significantly (P<0.01) underrepresented in the psoriatic lesion samples (37.3%). Representation of Propionibacterium species were lower in the psoriatic lesions (2.9+/-5.5%) than from normal persons (21.1+/-18.2%; P<0.001), whereas normal skin from the psoriatic patients showed intermediate levels (12.3+/-21.6%). We conclude that psoriasis is associated with substantial alteration in the composition and representation of the cutaneous bacterial biota.

PMID:
18648509
PMCID:
PMC2447873
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0002719
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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