Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Respir Physiol Neurobiol. 2008 Aug 31;162(3):204-9. doi: 10.1016/j.resp.2008.06.020. Epub 2008 Jul 5.

Exercise-related change in airway blood flow in humans: relationship to changes in cardiac output and ventilation.

Author information

1
School of Physiotherapy and Exercise Science, Griffith University, Gold Coast Campus, Qld 4222, Australia. n.morris@griffith.edu.au

Abstract

This study examined the relationship between airway blood flow (Q(aw)), ventilation (V(E)) and cardiac output (Q(tot)) during exercise in healthy humans (n=12, mean age 34+/-11 yr). Q(aw) was estimated from the uptake of the soluble gas dimethyl ether while V(E) and Q(tot) were measured using open circuit spirometry. Measurements were made prior to and during exercise at 34+/-5 W (Load 1) and 68+/-10 W (Load 2) and following the cessation of exercise (recovery). Q(aw) increased in a stepwise fashion (P<0.05) from rest (52.8+/-19.5 microl min(-1) ml(-1)) to exercise at Load 1 (67.0+/-20.3 microl min(-1) ml(-1)) and Load 2 (84.0+/-22.9 microl min(-1) ml(-1)) before returning to pre-exercise levels in recovery (51.7+/-13.2 microl min(-1) ml(-1)). Q(aw) was positively correlated with both Q(tot) (r=0.58, P<0.01) and V(E) (r=0.50, P<0.01). These results demonstrate that the increase in Q(aw) is linked to an exercise related increase in both Q(tot) and V(E) and may be necessary to prevent excessive airway cooling and drying.

PMID:
18647664
PMCID:
PMC2805184
DOI:
10.1016/j.resp.2008.06.020
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center