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Biomedica. 2008 Mar;28(1):38-49.

[Cardiovascular risk markers in schoolchildren from five provinces of eastern Colombia].

[Article in Spanish]

Author information

1
Grupo de Nutrición, Subdirección de Investigación, Instituto Nacional de Salud, Bogotá, D.C, Colombia. mvillarreal@ins.gov.co

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Cardiovascular disease is a public health problem globally; it represents the second cause of mortality in Colombia. This highlights the importance of identifying risk markers from the time of childhood, in order to diminish mortality rates proactively.

OBJECTIVES:

The lipid profile, homocysteine and C reactive protein plasma concentrations were determined in order to identify relationships between these markers and age, sex and school type.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

A descriptive study was undertaken in 600 schoolchildren, aged 5 to 14, where the lipid profile, and the plasmatic concentrations of homocysteine and C-reactive protein were evaluated.

RESULTS:

Higher average levels of total cholesterol, low density cholesterol and triglycerides were observed in females (p<0.05) as compared with males. The prevalences of high lipid were higher in females than in males--7.9% vs. 3.0% for total cholesterol; 11.6% vs. 4.7% for low density cholesterol and 6.9% vs. 5.7% for triglycerides. Children in private schools had higher levels of lipid than those in public ones (p<0.05). The prevalence of homocysteine levels above 6.3 micromol/L was higher (64.3%) in males than in females (56.1%). No statistically significant differences with respect to sex, age or type of school were observed when comparing the prevalence of high levels C-reactive proteins.

CONCLUSIONS:

The prevalence of high lipid profile levels in female schoolchildren suggested a policy of adopting intervention measures at an early age. Other factors require further investigation, such as the homocysteine levels observed in males and the C protein levels in order to detect their contribution to cardiovascular disease.

PMID:
18645660
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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