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Health Rep. 2008 Jun;19(2):77-84.

Effects of measurement on obesity and morbidity.

Author information

1
Health Information and Research Division, Statistics Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Margot.Shields@statcan.ca

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

This article compares associations between body mass index (BMI) categories based on self-reported vers measured data with selected health conditions. The goal is to see if the misclassifications resulting from the use of self-reported data alters associations between excess body weight and these health conditions.

METHODS:

The analysis is based on 2,667 respondents aged 40 years or older from the 2005 Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) who, during a face-to-face interview, provided self-reported values for height and weight and were then measured by trained interviewers. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to examine associations between BMI categories (based on self-reported and measured data) and obesity-related health conditions.

RESULTS:

On average, BMI based on self-reported height and weight was 1.3 kg/m2 lower than BMI based on measured values. Consequently, based on self-reported data, a substantial proportion of individuals with excess body weight were erroneously placed in lower BMI categories. This misclassification resulted in elevated associations between overweight/obesity and morbidity.

PMID:
18642521
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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