Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Nutrition. 2008 Nov-Dec;24(11-12):1097-102. doi: 10.1016/j.nut.2008.05.017. Epub 2008 Jul 21.

High-fat diet: a trigger of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis? Preliminary findings in obese subjects.

Author information

1
Hospital das Clinicas and Sao Paulo University Medical School, Sao Paulo, Brazil.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

We correlated dietary profile and markers of visceral and somatic obesities in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

METHODS:

Patients with histologically proven fatty infiltration of the liver (n = 25, 52 +/- 11 y of age, 64% women) underwent abdominal computed tomography, bioelectrical impedance, and anthropometric measurements. Insulin resistance was evaluated (homeostasis model assessment) and dietary intake of macronutrients was estimated by 24-h recall. Main outcome measurements were correlation of carbohydrate and fat ingestion with liver histology.

RESULTS:

Metabolic syndrome was present in 72% of the population, and increased waist circumference and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol occurred in 66%. Total body fat (bioimpedance) and dietary intake of lipids were higher in patients with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (P < 0.05), but not in diabetic subjects who exhibited more steatosis than non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Waist circumference exhibited a good correlation with homeostasis model assessment, total energy intake, and ingestion of specific fatty acids. Body mass index correlated well with somatic and visceral adiposities.

CONCLUSION:

Energy intake and visceral adiposity were predisposing factors for fatty liver disease. Lipid input correlated with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis in the entire group and after stratification for diabetes. These findings suggest that lipid intake may play a greater role in non-alcoholic steatohepatitis than hitherto suspected.

PMID:
18640006
DOI:
10.1016/j.nut.2008.05.017
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Support Center