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Am J Surg. 2009 Jan;197(1):24-9. doi: 10.1016/j.amjsurg.2007.11.026. Epub 2008 Jul 17.

Single-stage closure of enterocutaneous fistula and stomas in the presence of large abdominal wall defects using the components separation technique.

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1
Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Postbox 22660, 1100 DD Amsterdam, the Netherlands.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Closure of an enterocutaneous fistula and/or stomas in the presence of large abdominal wall defects is a challenging problem. In the present study, the results of the components separation technique are described.

METHODS:

All patients with an enterocutaneous fistula and/or stomas in the presence of large abdominal wall defects (ie, laparostomy of ventral hernia) who underwent a single-stage repair using the components separation technique in the period from January 2000 to July 2007 were reviewed retrospectively.

RESULTS:

A total of 32 patients were included. The median operating time was 204 minutes (range 87-573). In 18 patients, additionally to the components separation, an absorbable mesh was used. Postoperatively, in 16 patients 22 complications were reported. There were 9 patients with local wound problems. The median postoperative hospital stay was 12 days (range 5-74). Seven patients developed a ventral hernia. Four of them were small asymptomatic recurrences. Four out of the 15 patients with an enterocutaneous fistula developed a recurrent fistula. The median follow-up was 20 months (range 3-54).

CONCLUSION:

Closure of enterocutaneous fistula and/or stomas and simultaneous repair of large abdominal wall defects is feasible using the components separation technique but morbidity is considerable. Early recurrence of abdominal hernia and fistula is acceptable.

PMID:
18639232
DOI:
10.1016/j.amjsurg.2007.11.026
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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