Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Haemophilia. 2008 Sep;14(5):952-5. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2516.2008.01814.x. Epub 2008 Jul 14.

Intracranial haemorrhage in patients with congenital haemostatic defects.

Author information

1
Department of Hematology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India. pravas_mishra@rediffmail.com

Abstract

We investigated 52 of 457 patients with congenital factor deficiencies with 57 episodes of intracranial haemorrhage (ICH) between 1998 and 2007. There were 38 severe haemophiliacs, 6 with factor XIII deficiency, 5 with factor X deficiency, 2 factor V-deficient patients, and 1 with type 3 von Willebrand disease (VWD). The median age was 8 years (range 1 month-22 years). Most patients were below 15 years of age (86.5%). All patients with factor X deficiency were between 1 and 5 months of age. ICH was the primary bleeding episode leading to detection of factor deficiency in 19.2% (five patients with severe haemophilia and all patients with factor X deficiency). Trauma caused bleeding in 66%. None of the patients with factor X deficiency had history of prior trauma. Surgery was performed in five patients with subdural haematomas, all of whom survived. Conservative factor replacement with 100% correction for 3 days followed by 50-60% correction for 7 days was possible in 60% patients. Seizures requiring prolonged therapy were noted in eight patients. Death was recorded in 15 patients (29%). Inadequate therapy in the form of delay or insufficient replacement was noted in 7/15 deaths. ICH was seen in 11.3% of all patients with coagulation factor deficiencies. Factor X deficiency presented with ICH at an earlier age. Inadequate replacement therapy including delayed treatment caused nearly 50% of all deaths. Most patients can be managed satisfactorily with adequate replacement therapy alone, with surgery being reserved for those with worsening neurological conditions.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley
Loading ...
Support Center