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J Am Coll Cardiol. 2008 Jul 22;52(4):287-92. doi: 10.1016/j.jacc.2008.03.052.

Exaggerated blood pressure response to exercise is associated with augmented rise of angiotensin II during exercise.

Author information

1
Cardiology Division, Yonsei Cardiovascular Center, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The aim of this study was to investigate the association between an exaggerated blood pressure (BP) response to exercise and augmented angiotensin (Ang) II rise during exercise.

BACKGROUND:

Although a central pressor effect of Ang II has been implicated in the pathogenesis of hypertension, the relationship between Ang II and exaggerated BP response to exercise is unclear.

METHODS:

Thirty-six subjects with an exaggerated BP response to exercise (18 men, age 50 +/- 16 years, Group II) were compared with 36 age- and gender-matched control subjects (18 men, age 50 +/- 16 years, Group I) with normal BP reactivity. The subjects who had resting BP >or=140/90 mm Hg or were treated with any antihypertensive drugs were excluded. The blood was sampled at rest and immediately after peak exercise for measurement of renin, Ang II, aldosterone, and catecholamine.

RESULTS:

At rest, there were no significant differences in BP, renin, aldosterone, and catecholamine levels between the 2 groups. The renin, aldosterone, and catecholamine were increased during exercise, but there were no significant differences between the groups. However, log Ang II at rest (0.78 +/- 0.32 vs. 0.98 +/- 0.38, p = 0.004) and peak exercise (0.84 +/- 0.35 vs. 1.17 +/- 0.51, p < 0.001) and the magnitude of the increment of log Ang II with exercise (0.06 +/- 0.12 vs. 0.19 +/- 0.20, p = 0.003) were significantly higher in the exaggerated BP response group.

CONCLUSIONS:

An exaggerated BP response to exercise was associated with augmented rise of Ang II during exercise.

PMID:
18634984
DOI:
10.1016/j.jacc.2008.03.052
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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