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Clin Pediatr (Phila). 2008 Nov;47(9):891-900. doi: 10.1177/0009922808319965. Epub 2008 Jul 14.

A violence-prevention program helps teach medical students and pediatric residents about childhood aggression.

Author information

1
Monroe Carell Jr. Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt, Department of Pediatrics, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA. seth.scholer@vanderbilt.edu

Abstract

There were 65 third-year medical students and 59 pediatric residents who participated. The intervention was a 40-minute multimedia program that teaches how to counsel parents about childhood aggression. Comparing pre- and 2-month postintervention data, there was an increase in the proportion of medical students (11% pre vs 92% post; P < .001) and residents (3% pre vs 95% post; P < .001) who felt that their ability to counsel parents about hurtful behavior was high or very high. Compared with baseline, a higher proportion of trainees at the 2-month follow-up recommended redirecting (11% pre vs 69% post; P < .001), promoting empathy (13% pre vs 42% post; P < .001), and not using physical punishment (25% pre vs 50% post; P < .001). A brief, independently viewed curriculum addition expanded the repertoire of health care trainees related to counseling parents about childhood aggression. These findings have implications for violence prevention.

PMID:
18626103
DOI:
10.1177/0009922808319965
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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