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Prev Med. 2008 Oct;47(4):433-7. doi: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2008.06.011. Epub 2008 Jun 20.

Gender difference in the relationships between vision and hearing impairments and negative well-being.

Author information

1
Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, School of Medicine, Keio University, Tokyo, Japan.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To evaluate the association of hearing impairment, vision impairment and their combination (dual sensory impairment) with negative well-being such as depression, subjective poor health and the reduced functional ability in community-dwelling older adults, and to determine whether any association varies by gender.

METHODS:

Between 2005 and 2006, we objectively examined vision and hearing impairment (using best-corrected visual acuity and pure-tone audiometric test) in 843 people aged 65 years and older (351 males, 492 females) in a rural Japanese town. Through a home visit interview survey using a structured questionnaire, we also collected information on depression (the five-item Geriatric Depression Scale), subjective poor health, and reduced functional activity (the Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology's Index of Competence).

RESULTS:

We observed gender differences in the association between sensory impairment and depression. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that hearing impairment in males (adjusted odds ratio: 2.22, 95% confidence interval; 1.07-4.61) and vision impairment in females (1.91, 1.14-3.21) were related to depression. Vision impairment and dual sensory impairment were also associated with subjective poor health and reduced functional activity in both sexes.

CONCLUSIONS:

Sensory impairment is significantly associated with negative well-being in older persons, and its association with depression may differ between males and females.

PMID:
18619483
DOI:
10.1016/j.ypmed.2008.06.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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