Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
PLoS One. 2008 Jul 9;3(7):e2630. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0002630.

Triacylglycerol fatty acid composition in diet-induced weight loss in subjects with abnormal glucose metabolism--the GENOBIN study.

Author information

1
School of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, Department of Clinical Nutrition and Food and Health Research Centre, University of Kuopio, Kuopio, Finland. ursula.schwab@uku.fi

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The effect of weight loss on different plasma lipid subclasses at the molecular level is unknown. The aim of this study was to examine whether a diet-induced weight reduction result in changes in the extended plasma lipid profiles (lipidome) in subjects with features of metabolic syndrome in a 33-week intervention.

METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS:

Plasma samples of 9 subjects in the weight reduction group and 10 subjects in the control group were analyzed using mass spectrometry based lipidomic and fatty acid analyses. Body weight decreased in the weight reduction group by 7.8+/-2.9% (p<0.01). Most of the serum triacylglycerols and phosphatidylcholines were reduced. The decrease in triacylglycerols affected predominantly the saturated short chain fatty acids. This decrease of saturated short chain fatty acid containing triacylglycerols correlated with the increase of insulin sensitivity. However, levels of several longer chain fatty acids, including arachidonic and docosahexanoic acid, were not affected by weight loss. Levels of other lipids known to be associated with obesity such as sphingolipids and lysophosphatidylcholines were not altered by weight reduction.

CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE:

Diet-induced weight loss caused significant changes in global lipid profiles in subjects with abnormal glucose metabolism. The observed changes may affect insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism in these subjects.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00621205.

PMID:
18612464
PMCID:
PMC2440352
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0002630
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Public Library of Science Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center