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World J Biol Psychiatry. 2009;10(4 Pt 3):905-12. doi: 10.1080/15622970801901828.

Smooth pursuit eye movement (SPEM) in patients with multiple complex developmental disorder (MCDD), a subtype of the pervasive developmental disorder.

Author information

1
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, University Medical Center, Utrecht, and the Rudolph Magnus Institute of Neurosciences, The Netherlands. b.e.lahuis@umcutrecht.nl

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Multiple complex developmental disorder (MCDD) is a well-defined and validated behavioural subtype of pervasive developmental disorder-not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS) and is thought to be associated with a higher risk of developing a schizophrenic spectrum disorder. The question was addressed whether patients with MCDD show the same psychophysiological abnormalities as seen in patients with schizophrenia.

METHOD:

Smooth pursuit eye movement (pursuit gain and saccadic parameters) was measured in children with either MCDD (n=18) or autism (n=18), and in age- and IQ-matched controls (n=36), as well as in a group of adult patients with schizophrenia (n=14) and a group of adult controls (n=17).

RESULTS:

We found the expected effect of lower velocity gain and increased number of saccades in schizophrenic patients. Children with MCDD also showed a lower velocity gain compared to controls children. In contrast, velocity gain was similar in autistic subjects and controls. No differences for velocity gain were found in a direct comparison between MCDD and autism. Saccadic parameters were not significantly different from controls in either MCDD or autistic subjects.

CONCLUSION:

Children with MCDD, like schizophrenic adults, show a reduced velocity gain, which could indicate that schizophrenia spectrum disorders and MCDD share (at least to some degree) a common neurobiological background.

PMID:
18609441
DOI:
10.1080/15622970801901828
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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