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Scand J Gastroenterol. 2008;43(11):1353-9. doi: 10.1080/00365520802158622.

GG genotype of cyclin D1 G870A polymorphism is associated with non-cardiac gastric cancer in a high-risk region of China.

Author information

1
Department of Gastroenterology, First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an, China.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Cyclin D1 (CCND1) is a regulatory protein involved in the cell cycle of both normal and neoplastic cells. Polymorphism of this gene at codon 242 in exon 4 (A870G) has an impact on the risk of several human cancers. The purpose of this study was to study the relation between the CCND1 A870G gene polymorphism and the risk of non-cardiac gastric cancer in a Chinese population.

MATERIAL AND METHODS:

The study population consisted of 159 patients with non-cardiac gastric cancer and 162 cancer-free controls. CCND1 870A/G polymorphism was genotyped by a polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) assay and sequencing.

RESULTS:

CCND1 genotype distribution among the patients was significantly different from that among controls; AA (odds ratio (OR)=0.348, 95% CI: 0.163-0.742) and GA (OR=0.715, 95% CI: 0.506-1.012) genotypes were significantly lower in the gastric cancer patients than in the controls when subjects with the GG genotype served as the reference category. In other words, the risk of gastric cancer for subjects with the GG genotype was 2.8 times that of subjects with the AA genotype, and 1.4 times that of subjects with the GA genotype. Furthermore, in the stratification analyses, the risk of GG genotype was more evident in subjects >or=60 years of age and those positive for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection.

CONCLUSIONS:

The CCND1870 GG genotype is associated with an increased risk for non-cardiac gastric cancer in patients in a high-risk area of China. Larger studies with multiple polymorphisms are needed to verify this finding and the function of this polymorphism needs to be further investigated.

PMID:
18609126
DOI:
10.1080/00365520802158622
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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