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Langenbecks Arch Surg. 2009 Jan;394(1):93-7. doi: 10.1007/s00423-008-0382-7. Epub 2008 Jul 8.

Gastric remnant cancer: an old problem with novel concerns.

Author information

1
Department of General Surgery, Ege University Hospital, 35100, Bornova, Izmir, Turkey. ozgur.firat@ege.edu.tr

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIMS:

The patients with cancers in the remnant stomachs after previous partial resections for benign diseases constitute a peculiar subset of the patients with gastric cancer. They are generally at advanced stages on admissions due to disregarding the symptoms related to cancer.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

Twenty six patients with cancer arising from the remnant stomach were analyzed. Clinicopathologic features such as age, gender, time interval between the initial operation and diagnosis of gastric remnant cancer, preoperative symptoms, surgical management, and tumor characteristics like size, location, histopathology, depth of invasion, lymph node involvement, presence of distant metastasis, and stages were documented.

RESULTS:

None of the cancers were diagnosed by routine surveillance and all the patients were symptomatic at the time of diagnosis. Twenty five patients were qualified for surgery. The resectability rate was 61% (n = 16). The ability to perform a curative resection and tumor location at the anastomotic site were determined as the factors significantly influencing survival (p < 0.05).

CONCLUSION:

Curative resection has to be the goal of surgical management in patients with gastric remnant cancer. Concerning clinician should be sceptical about a newly developing cancer in order to detect it in an early stage and enhance resectability.

PMID:
18607624
DOI:
10.1007/s00423-008-0382-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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