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J Theor Biol. 2008 Sep 21;254(2):466-75. doi: 10.1016/j.jtbi.2008.05.033. Epub 2008 Jul 7.

Role of the malate-aspartate shuttle on the metabolic response to myocardial ischemia.

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  • 1Department of Biomedical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Wickenden 427, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA.

Abstract

The malate-aspartate (M-A) shuttle provides an important mechanism to regulate glycolysis and lactate metabolism in the heart by transferring reducing equivalents from cytosol into mitochondria. However, experimental characterization of the M-A shuttle has been incomplete because of limitations in quantifying cytosolic and mitochondrial metabolites. In this study, we developed a multi-compartment model of cardiac metabolism with detailed presentation of the M-A shuttle to quantitatively predict non-observable fluxes and metabolite concentrations under normal and ischemic conditions in vivo. Model simulations predicted that the M-A shuttle is functionally localized to a subdomain that spans the mitochondrial and cytosolic spaces. With the onset of ischemia, the M-A shuttle flux rapidly decreased to a new steady state in proportion to the reduction in blood flow. Simulation results suggest that the reduced M-A shuttle flux during ischemia was not due to changes in shuttle-associated enzymes and transporters. However, there was a redistribution of shuttle-associated metabolites in both cytosol and mitochondria. Therefore, the dramatic acceleration in glycolysis and the switch to lactate production that occur immediately after the onset of ischemia is mediated by reduced M-A shuttle flux through metabolite redistribution of shuttle associated species across the mitochondrial membrane.

PMID:
18603266
PMCID:
PMC2572303
DOI:
10.1016/j.jtbi.2008.05.033
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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