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Basic Res Cardiol. 2008 Sep;103(5):398-406. doi: 10.1007/s00395-008-0733-0. Epub 2008 Jul 3.

The role of inflammatory cytokines in endothelial dysfunction.

Author information

1
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211, USA. zhangcu@missouri.edu

Abstract

Clinical and experimental data support a link between endothelial dysfunction and inflammation. Inflammatory cytokines are important protagonists in formation of atherosclerotic plaque, eliciting effects throughout the atherosclerotic vessel. Importantly, the development of atherosclerotic lesions, regardless of the risk factor, e.g., diabetes, hypertension, obesity, is characterized by disruption in normal function of the endothelial cells. Endothelial cells, which line the internal lumen of the vasculature, are part of a complex system that regulates vasodilation and vasoconstriction, growth of vascular smooth muscle cells, inflammation, and hemostasis, maintaining a proper blood supply to tissues and regulating inflammation and coagulation. Current concepts suggest that the earliest event in atherogenesis is endothelial dysfunction, manifested by deficiencies in the production of nitric oxide (NO) and prostacyclin. The focus of this review is to summarize recent evidence showing the effects of inflammation on vascular dysfunction in ischemic-heart disease, which may prompt new directions for targeting inflammation in future therapies.

PMID:
18600364
PMCID:
PMC2705866
DOI:
10.1007/s00395-008-0733-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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