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J Lipid Res. 2008 Oct;49(10):2230-9. doi: 10.1194/jlr.M800174-JLR200. Epub 2008 Jul 1.

A novel function of lipoprotein [a] as a preferential carrier of oxidized phospholipids in human plasma.

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1
Department of Vascular Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.

Abstract

Oxidized phospholipids (OxPLs) on apolipoprotein B-100 (apoB-100) particles are strongly associated with lipoprotein [a] (Lp[a]). In this study, we evaluated whether Lp[a] is preferentially the carrier of OxPL in human plasma. The content of OxPL on apoB-100 particles was measured with monoclonal antibody E06, which recognizes the phosphocholine (PC) headgroup of oxidized but not native phospholipids. To assess whether OxPLs were preferentially bound by Lp[a] as opposed to other lipoproteins, immunoprecipitation and ultracentrifugation experiments, in vitro transfer studies, and chemiluminescent ELISAs were performed. Immunoprecipitation of Lp[a] from human plasma with an apolipoprotein [a] (apo[a])-specific antibody demonstrated that more than 85% of E06 reactivity (i.e., OxPL) coimmunoprecipitated with Lp[a]. Ultracentrifugation experiments showed that nearly all OxPLs were found in fractions containing apo[a], as opposed to other apolipoproteins. In vitro transfer studies showed that oxidized LDL preferentially donates OxPLs to Lp[a], as opposed to LDL, in a time- and temperature-dependent manner, even in aqueous buffer. Approximately 50% of E06 immunoreactivity could be extracted from isolated Lp[a] following exposure of plasma to various lipid solvents. These data demonstrate that Lp[a] is the preferential carrier of PC-containing OxPL in human plasma. This unique property of Lp[a] suggests novel insights into its physiological function and mechanisms of atherogenicity.

PMID:
18594118
DOI:
10.1194/jlr.M800174-JLR200
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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