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Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2008 Jul 1;105(26):9081-6. doi: 10.1073/pnas.0703452105. Epub 2008 Jun 25.

Mammalian-like features of sleep structure in zebra finches.

Author information

1
Sloan-Swartz Center for Theoretical Neurobiology, Computational Neurobiology Laboratory, and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA. philip@salk.edu

Abstract

A suite of complex electroencephalographic patterns of sleep occurs in mammals. In sleeping zebra finches, we observed slow wave sleep (SWS), rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, an intermediate sleep (IS) stage commonly occurring in, but not limited to, transitions between other stages, and high amplitude transients reminiscent of K-complexes. SWS density decreased whereas REM density increased throughout the night, with late-night characterized by substantially more REM than SWS, and relatively long bouts of REM. Birds share many features of sleep in common with mammals, but this collective suite of characteristics had not been known in any one species outside of mammals. We hypothesize that shared, ancestral characteristics of sleep in amniotes evolved under selective pressures common to songbirds and mammals, resulting in convergent characteristics of sleep.

PMID:
18579776
PMCID:
PMC2440357
DOI:
10.1073/pnas.0703452105
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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