Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2008 Jul 1;105(26):8846-9. doi: 10.1073/pnas.0711988105. Epub 2008 Jun 23.

Contextual priming: where people vote affects how they vote.

Author information

1
Marketing Department, The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. jberger@wharton.upenn.edu

Abstract

American voters are assigned to vote at a particular polling location (e.g., a church, school, etc.). We show these assigned polling locations can influence how people vote. Analysis of a recent general election demonstrates that people who were assigned to vote in schools were more likely to support a school funding initiative. This effect persisted even when controlling for voters' political views, demographics, and unobservable characteristics of individuals living near schools. A follow-up experiment using random assignment suggests that priming underlies these effects, and that they can occur outside of conscious awareness. These findings underscore the subtle power of situational context to shape important real-world decisions.

PMID:
18574152
PMCID:
PMC2449328
DOI:
10.1073/pnas.0711988105
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center