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Circulation. 2008 Jul 8;118(2):140-8. doi: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.107.737890. Epub 2008 Jun 23.

In vivo monitoring of inflammation after cardiac and cerebral ischemia by fluorine magnetic resonance imaging.

Author information

1
Institut für Herz- und Kreislaufphysiologie, Heinrich-Heine-Universität, Postfach 101007, 40001 Düsseldorf, Germany. floegel@uni-duesseldorf.de

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

In this study, we developed and validated a new approach for in vivo visualization of inflammatory processes by magnetic resonance imaging using biochemically inert nanoemulsions of perfluorocarbons (PFCs).

METHODS AND RESULTS:

Local inflammation was provoked in 2 separate murine models of acute cardiac and cerebral ischemia, followed by intravenous injection of PFCs. Simultaneous acquisition of morphologically matching proton ((1)H) and fluorine ((19)F) images enabled an exact anatomic localization of PFCs after application. Repetitive (1)H/(19)F magnetic resonance imaging at 9.4 T revealed a time-dependent infiltration of injected PFCs into the border zone of infarcted areas in both injury models, and histology demonstrated a colocalization of PFCs with cells of the monocyte/macrophage system. We regularly found the accumulation of PFCs in lymph nodes. Using rhodamine-labeled PFCs, we identified circulating monocytes/macrophages as the main cell fraction taking up injected nanoparticles.

CONCLUSIONS:

PFCs can serve as a "positive" contrast agent for the detection of inflammation by magnetic resonance imaging, permitting a spatial resolution close to the anatomic (1)H image and an excellent degree of specificity resulting from the lack of any (19)F background. Because PFCs are nontoxic, this approach may have a broad application in the imaging and diagnosis of numerous inflammatory disease states.

PMID:
18574049
PMCID:
PMC2735653
DOI:
10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.107.737890
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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